Username:

Password:

Forgot Password? / Help

Tag: arts

0

THE SHAMAN The highly acclaimed, blockbuster-style short film see it here first

Capture

   The Shaman came out in  March. And now, after a profitable run at movie festivals, you may lastly see it for your self.

At seventeen minutes, The Shaman is a bit longer than many different shorts, however that’s to not its detriment. It simply contributes to the general sense that what you’re truly seeing is a full cinematic characteristic movie—which is smart, because it was initially conceived as one. Marco Kalantari (Ainoa) makes use of each second he has to full impact. Now we have would-building, efficient exposition, motion scenes, and a confrontation that’s all about willpower.

The premise is that a warfare is being waged–a conflict wherein shamans are used to go to the afterlife, so as to speak to the souls of the enemy’s conflict machines. A couple of minutes of dialog can deliver these souls over–a victory for the shamans. However in a battle with one among

them, a shaman will get a than he bargained for.

he highly acclaimed, blockbuster-style short film THE SHAMAN premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York in 2015. After that it ran successfully at numerous film festivals around the globe, including Los Angeles, London, San Diego and the DragonCon in Atlanta. The trailer turned into a viral sensation with over 4 million views.

The dark year 2204, in a world that has seen 73 years of continuous war. Recently mankind re-discovered the arts of Shamanism. The Shaman’s school of thought believes that every person or object has a soul. During battle Shamans step over into the Netherworld to find and convert the souls of their enemies’ giant battle machines. This tactic enables a single man to overcome an invincibly seeming steel monster.

This is the story of Joshua, a Shaman, who is sent on a mission to convert the soul of a giant battle colossus. He does not yet know that the soul is prepared for his coming and that the deadly psychological soul-to-soul confrontation in the Netherworld will be on eye level.

   

My Hyper-Realistic Plate Art That I Call “Plart”

I was pretty much born with paint on my hands! Over the years I have pursued my passion for the fine arts through many avenues, but it was around three years ago that I discovered the joy of working with ceramics and porcelain.

As the Resident Artist of the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Toronto, my hand-painted plates made their original debut at TOCA, the Ritz’s signature eatery. Here they continue to serve the purpose of both function and intrigue; a plate at every setting of the 120-seat restaurant sparks both conversation and inspiration for future design. To date I have painted over 1500 plates and counting, and my custom designs range from landscapes, portraits, animals, food, and everything in between. While my explorations in plart are proving to be rewarding (painting custom plates for the A-list during the Toronto International Film Festival is a pretty wicked job perk, right?!), there is nothing more inspiring to me than bringing joy through custom art to clients all over the world!
0

Gene Wilder Biography Author, Actor, Comedian (1933–)

Gene Wilder - Willy Wonka (TV-14; 01:14) Watch a short video about Gene Wilder to learn how he recovered after the loss of his wife Gilda Radner.

Synopsis

Gene Wilder began his movie career in 1967's Bonnie and Clyde, but he became famous as a favorite of writer/director Mel Brooks. His wacky roles in films such as Young Frankenstein, Blazing Saddles and Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory made him an unforgettable comedy icon. In his later years, Wilder has become a serious novelist, writing a memoir and several novels.

Early Life

Gene Wilder was born Jerome Silberman in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on June 11, 1933, to a Jewish family. His father, William, had emigrated from Russia. His mother, Jeanne, was often ill from complications from rheumatic heart disease, and a doctor warned the 8-year-old Jerome, "Don't ever argue with your mother... you might kill her. Try to make her laugh." These circumstances began Wilder's lifelong calling to acting, as he made his mother laugh by putting on different accents. After a brief stint in a California military academy, Wilder moved back to Milwaukee and became involved with the local theater scene, making his stage debut as Balthasar in a production of Romeo and Juliet. After graduating from high school, Wilder studied communication and theater arts at the University of Iowa, following that with a year studying theater and fencing at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol, United Kingdom. He returned to the United States to study the Stanislavski method of acting but was promptly drafted into the U.S. Army for two years, during which time he worked as a medic in Pennsylvania. Next, Wilder moved to New York City, where he took a variety of odd jobs, including a position as a fencing teacher, to support himself while he studied acting.

Early Career

At age 26, Wilder decided that he "couldn't quite see a marquee reading 'Jerry Silberman as Macbeth'" and took the stage name Gene Wilder. He took his new first name from a character in a Thomas Wolfe novel, and his last from the playwright Thornton Wilder. He started appearing with some regularity in off-Broadway and Broadway shows. In a 1963 production ofMother Courage and Her Children, he met Anne Bancroft, who introduced him to her boyfriend, Mel Brooks. Wilder and Brooks became fast friends, and Brooks decided he wanted to cast Wilder in a production of the screenplay he was writing, The Producers.

Film Career

Wilder made his film debut with a minor role in 1967's Bonnie and Clyde. He took on his first major role in The Producers, playing Leo Bloom against Zero Mostel's Max Bialystock. The film was a box office flop and received mixed reviews, but Wilder earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He quickly became an in-demand commodity in Hollywood, taking parts in several comedies, including the idiosyncratic title character inWilly Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

Willy Wonka brought to life the weird and wild Roald Dahl book of the same name, and it thoroughly established Gene Wilder as a leading man who could hold his own in any comedic situation. As the enigmatic Wonka, Wilder chewed the scenery right into a Golden Glove nomination for best actor and became known to a legion of young film-goers.

Despite Wilder's personal success, though, none of his films of this period met with much commercial success. He finally broke that streak with a role in Woody Allen's 1972 film Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask). He then took a last-minute role in Mel Brooks' 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles, a decision that would help define his career.

Blazing Saddles was a western like no other, and it set out to offend every viewer equally. Now a cult classic, the movie set Wilder on a path through his other classic films, including four with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak (1976), Stir Crazy (1980), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989) and Another You (1991).

Stir Crazy, in which Wilder and Pryor played prison inmates, was a notable hit, and like Blazing Saddles before it, the film helped to cement Wilder's reputation as a comedy legend.

Wilder began writing and starring in more films in 1974, starting with Young Frankenstein (in which he played Dr. Frederick Frankenstein). Like Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein set out to turn an established genre, this time horror, on its head. Starring Wilder as the infamous Dr. Frankenstein's grandson, the movie is unrelenting in its jokes and sight gags, and audiences have been connecting with it since the day it hit theaters.

Wilder also wrote, directed and starred in 1975's The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother and 1977's The World's Greatest Lover. WhileYoung Frankenstein was a hit and achieved a huge cult following, the others failed to gain positive critical response and were commercially unsuccessful.

HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com
Facebook