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Review: Lights Out, God Help Me - Lights Out, God Help Me

Perhaps as a sign that Lights Out, God Help Me has found a sound that he is both proud of and one he wishes to stick with, the industrial producer released his self-titled album just last month. The Maine-based industrial project has had his brand of power noise and industrial antics featured on our
Perhaps as a sign that Lights Out, God Help Me has found a sound that he is both proud of and one he wishes to stick with, the industrial producer released his self-titled album just last month. The Maine-based industrial project has had his brand of power noise and industrial antics featured on our website before with perhaps his most impressive release being last year's All Will Drown. After being followed up with a remix EP All Will Burn and another Before The Lights Went Out featuring songs under his previous and defunct monikers, LOGHM has come back to us with this brand new album.

This self-titled release sees LOGHM play around and experiment with his voice more than ever before. This works to great effect on the sarcastic and monotone track that is 'Blame'. Listening to the song and lyrics might give way to exactly what he's attacking, but I'm not going to give that away (Hint: Which prolific industrial project just quit the scene?). That being said, cynicism and dark sarcasm has always been a major part of Lights Out, God Help Me's routine and that can be heard in other songs such as the nihilistic politically charged powerhouse that is 'Make America Bleed Again' and even the starting song 'Don't Listen to This'. 

Australian producer Isserley makes an appearance on the album as well within the song 'Lipstick And Blood'. Perfectly suited for Isserley as horror vibes run rampant in the song, she lends her vocals to the song with demented grace. Lights Out, God Help Me also covered an underground metal project called Crypt 33. The song in question, 'Fuckface', made an appearance on the horrible sleaze film 'I Spit On Your Corpse, I Piss On Your Grave' where LOGHM initially found it. The cover in question gives the band some needed credibility even though they aren't too well known. 

The final song on the album 'Chainsmoker' also deserves mention as it gives off early dark electro vibes. LOGHM's signature crunch is still present, but with the added higher pitch synth line and distorted vocals that reminisce of other dark electro projects 'Chainsmoker' becomes one of the most unique songs LOGHM has produced in his entire discography. 

With his self-titled release, Lights Out, God Help Me has not necessarily taken a step forward, but once again refined his sound and found a good set of chords to work with. The added collaboration and cover of Crypt 33's song were lovely bonuses attached, and 'Chainsmoker' makes me wonder how much more experimental the project may get. The album is available under the name your price model on Bandcamp, so what have you got to lose? 

Nov 06 2017

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