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Tag: book

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The Cure’s’ Robert Smith Stars in Classic Horror Comics

the teardrop from ‘The Cure’s’ Robert Smith is said to do many things, quote-goth-juice-the-most-powerful-hairspray-known-to-man-made-from-the-tears-of-robert-smith-noel-fielding-129-78-16

“Butcher Billy’s Tales From The Smith Comic Book Series” is what you get when you mix classic comic  things is so magical and amazing that it would bring a  smile to the face of the even the most gothic, goth.

Brazilian artist, Butcher Billy created these brilliant prints that borrow from classic comics as well as a couple of more contemporary horror selections with wonderful results.

Head over to his site to check out this series and his other equally awesome pieces. His shop at Redbubble already has a couple of these prints up for sale on T shirts.

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‘The Walking Dead’ May Have Cast A ‘Deadwood’ Actor As The Villainous Negan

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(Some spoilers ahead for comic and TV fans)

This should be considered as just a rumor for now, but it’s a convincing one. Let’s just get what you came here for out of the way, and not bury the lede: Garret Dillahunt (Justified, Deadwood) may have been cast as the terrible, no-good, murderous Negan in AMC’s The Walking Dead. The general consensus is that Negan’s arrival is imminent, and it wouldn’t be shocking at all if the barbed wire bat-swinging baddie finally made his appearance this season during the finale.

Negan The Walking Dead

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In Robert Kirkman’s comic book, he’s the man who ultimately kills (SPOILER) Glenn, crushing his skull with his weapon of choice: Lucille. Since Glenn may already be dead (but, then again, he may not), we might not see that scene in the TV series, which is a shame, because it would have intensified Negan’s threat. Maybe, he’ll just have to kill someone else. (I’m looking at you, Carl.)

So, why the belief that Dillahunt has been cast in the role? Well, there’s this tweet that went out earlier this week, for starters:

That’s the collection of The Walking Dead that introduces Negan — it’s not much to go on, but then, as The Spoiling Dead Fans pointed out, there’s the fact that TWD stars John Carroll Lynch (Eastman) and Alanna Masterson (Tara) began following Dillahunt on Twitter. Perhaps the most convincing Twitter evidence comes in the form of Scott M. Gimple — TWD showrunner — following Dillahunt, when he only follows a little over 300 people. If none of that has convinced you, then take a gander at the halo emoticon that the actor tweeted out after a coy response to whether Lucille has any significance to him:

Dillahunt plays up the comedy on Raising Hope, but on Deadwood and Justified, he showed the kind of villainous chops that would suit Negan just fine.

What do you think? Would he be a convincing Negan?

(Via Spoiling Dead Fans)

‘Alien Next Door’, Joey Spiotto’s Picture Book Reimagining a Xenomorph From the ‘Alien’ Films as a Friendly Martian

Alien Next Door Alien Next Door is a new book, created by artist Joey Spiotto (a.k.a. “Joebot“), that reimagines a creepy Xenomorph from the Alien film series as a friendly martian. The book, published by Titan Books, is currently available to purchase online from Amazon. Joey will be doing a book signing in Los Angeles at Gallery1988 (East) on November 7th, during his upcoming Storytime 2 art show. The Storytime 2 exhibit will feature 50 new pieces by Spiotto that are inspired by his favorite films, music, TV shows, and video games. Alien Next Door Alien Next Door Alien Next Door Alien Next Door

via io9
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Gene Wilder Biography Author, Actor, Comedian (1933–)

Gene Wilder - Willy Wonka (TV-14; 01:14) Watch a short video about Gene Wilder to learn how he recovered after the loss of his wife Gilda Radner.

Synopsis

Gene Wilder began his movie career in 1967's Bonnie and Clyde, but he became famous as a favorite of writer/director Mel Brooks. His wacky roles in films such as Young Frankenstein, Blazing Saddles and Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory made him an unforgettable comedy icon. In his later years, Wilder has become a serious novelist, writing a memoir and several novels.

Early Life

Gene Wilder was born Jerome Silberman in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on June 11, 1933, to a Jewish family. His father, William, had emigrated from Russia. His mother, Jeanne, was often ill from complications from rheumatic heart disease, and a doctor warned the 8-year-old Jerome, "Don't ever argue with your mother... you might kill her. Try to make her laugh." These circumstances began Wilder's lifelong calling to acting, as he made his mother laugh by putting on different accents. After a brief stint in a California military academy, Wilder moved back to Milwaukee and became involved with the local theater scene, making his stage debut as Balthasar in a production of Romeo and Juliet. After graduating from high school, Wilder studied communication and theater arts at the University of Iowa, following that with a year studying theater and fencing at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol, United Kingdom. He returned to the United States to study the Stanislavski method of acting but was promptly drafted into the U.S. Army for two years, during which time he worked as a medic in Pennsylvania. Next, Wilder moved to New York City, where he took a variety of odd jobs, including a position as a fencing teacher, to support himself while he studied acting.

Early Career

At age 26, Wilder decided that he "couldn't quite see a marquee reading 'Jerry Silberman as Macbeth'" and took the stage name Gene Wilder. He took his new first name from a character in a Thomas Wolfe novel, and his last from the playwright Thornton Wilder. He started appearing with some regularity in off-Broadway and Broadway shows. In a 1963 production ofMother Courage and Her Children, he met Anne Bancroft, who introduced him to her boyfriend, Mel Brooks. Wilder and Brooks became fast friends, and Brooks decided he wanted to cast Wilder in a production of the screenplay he was writing, The Producers.

Film Career

Wilder made his film debut with a minor role in 1967's Bonnie and Clyde. He took on his first major role in The Producers, playing Leo Bloom against Zero Mostel's Max Bialystock. The film was a box office flop and received mixed reviews, but Wilder earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He quickly became an in-demand commodity in Hollywood, taking parts in several comedies, including the idiosyncratic title character inWilly Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

Willy Wonka brought to life the weird and wild Roald Dahl book of the same name, and it thoroughly established Gene Wilder as a leading man who could hold his own in any comedic situation. As the enigmatic Wonka, Wilder chewed the scenery right into a Golden Glove nomination for best actor and became known to a legion of young film-goers.

Despite Wilder's personal success, though, none of his films of this period met with much commercial success. He finally broke that streak with a role in Woody Allen's 1972 film Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask). He then took a last-minute role in Mel Brooks' 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles, a decision that would help define his career.

Blazing Saddles was a western like no other, and it set out to offend every viewer equally. Now a cult classic, the movie set Wilder on a path through his other classic films, including four with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak (1976), Stir Crazy (1980), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989) and Another You (1991).

Stir Crazy, in which Wilder and Pryor played prison inmates, was a notable hit, and like Blazing Saddles before it, the film helped to cement Wilder's reputation as a comedy legend.

Wilder began writing and starring in more films in 1974, starting with Young Frankenstein (in which he played Dr. Frederick Frankenstein). Like Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein set out to turn an established genre, this time horror, on its head. Starring Wilder as the infamous Dr. Frankenstein's grandson, the movie is unrelenting in its jokes and sight gags, and audiences have been connecting with it since the day it hit theaters.

Wilder also wrote, directed and starred in 1975's The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother and 1977's The World's Greatest Lover. WhileYoung Frankenstein was a hit and achieved a huge cult following, the others failed to gain positive critical response and were commercially unsuccessful.

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Christopher Lee has died at the age of 93

Christopher Lee has died at the age of 93

The legendary actor was best known for his roles in Count Dracula, Hammer horror films, and Lord of the Rings.

Image: EMPICS Sports Photo Agency
CHRISTOPHER LEE, THE legendary actor who appeared in films spanning from Dracula to James Bond, has died at the age of 93. He had been hospitalised recently for respiratory problems and heart problems. The actor was best known for his dark roles in films such as The Wicker Man, Dracula, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, as well as the Hammer horror films in which he first found fame. However he was loathe to  be pigeonholed as ‘just’ a horror actor, in a career which spanned genres. He was one of the most memorable James Bond villains, playing Scaramanga in the 1974 films The Man With the Golden Gun. He was introduced to a new generation in his roles over the past two decades, including as Saruman in The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, and Count Dooku in the Star Wars films. He also appeared in Tim Burton films Alice in Wonderland and Sleepy Hollow. He died on Sunday morning in a London hospital, but his death was only confirmed this afternoon.

Film legend Sir Christopher Lee has died at the age of 93, it was reported today.

The actor - known as a horror star in the 1950s before finding fame again in later life - had been treated for heart failure and respiratory problems in hospital.

He died at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in London on Sunday morning, the Telegraph reported.

RIP: Sir Christopher Lee has died at the age of 93 in hospital, it was reported today

Classic: The star became known for his portrayal of Dracula in a series of Hammer Horror films

Classic: The star became known for his portrayal of Dracula in a series of Hammer Horror films

Wizard: Sir Christopher was known to a new generation as Saruman in the Lord of the Rings films

Wizard: Sir Christopher was known to a new generation as Saruman in the Lord of the Rings films

Sir Christopher played Dracula in a series of classic films produced by Hammer Horror, and played Bond villain Scaramanga in 1974's The Man With the Golden Gun.

He became known to a new generation of film fans with his roles in Lord of the Rings, where he played evil wizard Saruman, and the Star Wars prequels.

Some of his most acclaimed performances came in cult films - Sir Christopher starred in The Wicker Man, about a remote community living on a Scottish island, and Jinnah, a biopic about the founder of Pakistan.

After the news broke today, stars and fans paid tribute to the actor whose influence lasted for several generations.

Christopher Lee as Scaramanga in The Man with the Golden Gun

Appearance: The last known pictures of Christopher Lee, at the Berlin Film Festival in February

Couple: Sir Christopher with his wife Birgit at a fundraising ball at the Victoria & Albert Museum in 2012

Couple: Sir Christopher with his wife Birgit at a fundraising ball at the Victoria & Albert Museum in 2012

Jonathan Ross said: 'So sad to hear that Sir Christiphet Lee has died. A great actor, a great star, a surprisingly good singer and a lovely lovely man.'

Comedian Omid Djalili wrote on Twitter: 'Scared the living daylights out of me for years. And I loved him for it. RIP Christopher Lee.'

And Boris Johnson added: 'Really sad to hear about the death of Christopher Lee, one of the greatest British actors and a master of the macabre.'

Sir Christopher was married for 54 years to Birgit Kroencke, a Danish former model. The couple have one daughter, Christina.

He served in the Special Forces during the Second World War, but always refused to discuss what he had done during the war, saying he was bound by an oath of secrecy.

As well as his acclaimed acting career, he had a sideline as a heavy metal singer, releasing four albums in the past two decades, two of which were concept albums about the medieval emperor Charlemagne.

He also unmasked himself as an unlikely Tory in later life, speaking out in support of Michael Howard, William Hague and David Cameron.

His final film appearance is set to be in Angels of Notting Hill, a comedy about the clash of the everyday with celestial beings.

From Prince of Darkness to knight of the realm: The remarkable life and times of Christopher Lee

By JENNY AWFORD 

Fame: Christopher Lee as Dracula, the role that first propelled him to public attention

Fame: Christopher Lee as Dracula, the role that first propelled him to public attention

With his piercing eyes, booming voice and chilling presence, Sir Christopher Lee will be forever immortalised as the Prince of Darkness.

His menacing charisma established him early on as one of the film industry’s world-class villains and he went on to star in more than 260 movies before his death at 93.

Sir Christopher brought a demonic intensity to all his roles and became a household name playing notorious villains including Dracula, Scaramanga in The Man With The Golden Gun, Saruman in the Lord Of The Rings, and Count Dooku in the Star Wars prequels.

Hammer Films gave him his big break when they cast him as the creature in 1957’s The Curse of Frankenstein.

His remarkable mime performance as the brain-damaged monster convinced the studio to cast him in his definitive role as the Count in Dracula.

Suddenly Sir Christopher was a bankable star.

Concerned at being typecast in blood-curdling roles and wanting to break free from his image of Dracula, he agreed to star in the 1973 film, The Wicker Man, for free and considers it one of his greatest roles.

He was knighted for services to drama and charity in 2009 and received a BAFTA Fellowship in 2011.

The Hammer Films icon was also presented with a prized British Film Institute Fellowship by his Sleepy Hollow co-star, Johnny Depp, at the 2013 London Film Festival.

Depp described him as a 'national treasure' and said working with Lee was a 'childhood dream come true'.

Often hailed as 'legendary', Sir Christopher once joked: 'To be a legend, you've either got to be dead or excessively old.'

Menacing: Sir Christopher with co-ster Barbara Shelley in 1966's Dracula: Prince of Darkness

Menacing: Sir Christopher with co-ster Barbara Shelley in 1966's Dracula: Prince of Darkness

Villain: Sir Christopher played Scaramange in 1974 Bond film The Man With the Golden Gun

Villain: Sir Christopher played Scaramange in 1974 Bond film The Man With the Golden Gun

Standing at an imposing height of 6ft 5in, the world champion fencer did all of his own stunts and holds a Guinness World Record for participating in more on-screen sword fights than any actor in history.

Fluent in English, Italian, French, Spanish and German, he added to his impressive resume by providing the voice-over for many films and video games, including cult classic The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Sir Christopher also used his resonant and unmistakable tones to record several musical works and said he would rather have been an opera singer than anything else.

He became the oldest person ever to record lead vocals on a heavy metal track when he released a progressive symphonic power metal EP about the life of Charlemagne at the age of 88.

By the Sword and the Cross was so well received that he was honoured with the Spirit of Metal award in the 2010 Metal Hammer Golden God awards ceremony.

His career and unusual home life was recounted with self-deprecating wit in his autobiography, Lord of Misrule.

The book gives the reader a privileged glimpse into his upbringing and family life, revealing that he is descended from papal nobility.

Devoted: Sir Christopher was married to his wife Birgit for more than half a century

Devoted: Sir Christopher was married to his wife Birgit for more than half a century

His mother, Contessa Estelle Marie, was a famous Edwardian beauty who was painted by Sir John Lavery, Oswald Birley and Olive Snell.

Sir Christopher was happily married to Danish model Birgit Kroencke for 53 years and they had a daughter named Christina Erika Carandini Lee.

Before breaking into the film industry, he served in the Royal Air Force and intelligence services during the Second World War.

He was tasked with helping to track down Nazi war criminals in 1945 when he was seconded to the Central Registry of War Criminals and Security Suspects.

Sworn to secrecy, Sir Christopher has been guarded about disclosing any details of his work in military intelligence.

He said: ‘When people say to me, you know - were you in this? Were you in that? Did you work in this? Did you work in that? I always used to say ‘Can you keep a secret?’ And they would say 'Yes, yes' and I would say "So can I".’

Although he will probably be most remembered for his portrayal of a bloodsucking vampire, the true story of his life is actually more strange and fascinating than any of the films he starred in

 

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Release date of “The Strain” second season officially named

The Strain Season 2

The long-awaited continuation of the series based on the novel written by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan come on FX channel on Sunday, July 12. This information appeared on the website IMDB and official confirmed.

The second season of this bloody show promises to be very exciting – ancient vampire The Master begins a full-scale invasion of New York. More and more people infected with the worm, and thus become slaves to the will of Jusef Sardu. To stop the spread of the “Strigoi worm” CDC employees Nora Martinez and Eph Goodweather come up with a plan.

Guillermo del Toro’s The Strain had a fantastic first season that I enjoyed watching. FX has announced that vampire series will return with its second season on July 12th. From then on out you’ll be able to watch the show on Sundays at 10pm. The series is based on the horror thriller from del Toro and Chuck Hogan, and it was apparently the most-watched new cable drama of 2014. That's not really surprising, because of how good the show was.

The first episode of the second season will begin at 22:00 on channel FX. Wait is quite a bit!

The Strain TV series

The Strain TV series

FX announced the most terrible TV show of summer 2015. They release it on July 12

Rate TV series:

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Famous Mexican producer Guillermo del Toro in 2009-2012 wrote a book trilogy: "The Strain", "The Falling", "The Night Eternal". Their story was inspired by the famous novel by Bram Stoker's "Dracula". Books were written in Spanish and Chuck Hogan helped with the translation of these books into English. In America, they had enormous popularity. On this wave of success Del Toro decided to film the first part of the trilogy. TV Show script made by Carlton Cuse.

About "The Strain":

TV series is based on the 2009 novel by Guillermo Del Toro & Chuck Hogan named "The Strain". FX announced 12 episodes in first season of TV show starting from July 12. Forget about ordinary vampires - FX fearless show you true face of evil this summer.

First episode starting in New York. Transatlantic liner landing to airport with dead passengers on the board. After some time they all become alive, it is not only people, but fiends, ruthless vampires... From this moment the terrible strain begins, which triggered the epidemic. All of America is flooded with ruthless vampires. To protect humanity are seemingly not the right people: Ephraim Goodweather epidemiologist, Professor Abraham Setrakian, exterminator Vasiliy Fet and doctor Nora Martinez. Only together they can stop pandemic before it goes woldwide.

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Wondered What Happened To The Dwarves After The Hobbit Ended

  You've Already Seen A Few Of Them In The Fellowship Of The Ring!

The Hobbit

Whether you’re in the group that loves or in the group that hates the Hobbitmovies, there’s no denying that these were pretty big films that made A LOT of money! Even though the movie was called The Hobbit, most of the attention was focused on the dwarves and their epic quest to retake the Lonely Mountain from the dragon, Smaug. We spent three movies watching these dwarves fight for what was rightfully theirs, so it’s hard not to get attached to some of them. But have you ever wondered what happened to the dwarves after all was said and done? Dwarves live for a while, so where were these characters during The Lord of the Rings trilogy? The answers for some of them might not be exactly what you wanted to hear! Let’s dig in!

The Fate Of The Dwarves

Oin

Forty-eight years after being settled in the Lonely Mountain, Oin made his way back to Moria to reclaim the realm for the Dwarves. It was five years later that the orcs attacked, and when he could not escape over the Bridge of Khazad-dûm, Oin tried to exit through the Hollin Gate. It was there he was killed by the Watcher in the Water, a creature that Frodo and the rest of the Fellowship would later encounter.
UNLEASH THE KRAKEN!
UNLEASH THE KRAKEN!
            

Gloin

Ah yes! Gimli’s father. His life was much longer and more peaceful than his brother’s. He remained at the kingdom under the mountain and was also sent at the Council of Elrond when the Fellowship was formed. He would later die naturally at the age of 253.

Dwalin

Dwalin was a smart one. He decided to stay at the Lonely Mountain where he lived out the rest of his life, dying at the ripe, old age of 340. He lived through the war of the ring, but it was never revealed if he or Gloin ever took part in it.

Balin

Good ol' Balin. In the Hobbitmovies he was always one of the most liked Dwarves. In fact, he ended up leading an expedition to Moria where he later became The Lord of Moria for some time – until the orcs attacked and he was killed by one of their archers. Remember that Tomb in Fellowship of the Ring? Yup. That was Balin’s tomb.
Poor, old Balin :(
Poor, old Balin 🙁

Bifur & Bofur

Bifur has an axe in his skull, I think he’s had to deal with enough stuff in his life to be bothered with anymore violence. He also stayed back in the Lonely Mountain and lived out his life. His age at death is unknown. Ditto for Bofur. He also lived out his life in the mountain. You know, for a place called the Lonely Mountain, it doesn’t seem quite so lonely there, does it?

Bombur

Bombur, like many of the others stay behind in the Lonely Mountain and enjoyed the rest of his life…a little too much. Bombur had grown SO FAT that it eventually took the strength of six dwarves to lift him to the dinner table.

Dori & Nori

Dori and Nori also stayed in the mountain where they grew their wealth and lived rich, and happy, for the rest of their lives.

Ori

Like Dori and Nori, Ori – the lovable idiot – also stayed in the mountain where he lived out his life peacefully with a wife and children. EXCEPT THAT DIDN’T HAPPEN! Ori actually joined the expedition to Moria and after burying Balin he was killed by the onslaught of orcs that attacked. Remember that morbid diary entry Gandalf read in the Fellowship of the ring? That was Ori’s diary.
And that’s Ori...
And that’s Ori...

BONUS ROUND

Bard Bowman

NOT Will Turner
NOT Will Turner
Bard rebuilt his ancestral town of Dale at the foot of the Lonely Mountain. He eventually became its king, establishing and maintaining good relations with the dwarves, where he lived peacefully and his son Bain succeeded him after his death.

Tauriel

I should save this for when I do my Hobbit 'Based On' video eventually, but I need to vent it here. Kili never fell in love with an Elf, much less meet Tauriel because she wasn’t even a character in the book. Peter Jackson created her just for the movie so he could force in an awful dwarf/elf forbidden relationship to emotionally manipulate the audience (it didn't work). Evangeline Lily was great in her role, but her character felt unnecessary and only weakened the story in my opinion. -- So there you have it, the fate of the dwarves! The adventures that happened inThe Hobbit definitely impacted what would eventually take place in The Lord of the Rings trilogy, mainly due to it being how Bilbo found the ring of power. While, at times, there were unnecessary moments in the films, there were also moments that captured the magic of Middle-Earth and made you want to be part of it!

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Happy Birthday Vincent Price - May 27 13 Greatest Vincent Price Movies

 christopher lee vincent price 999

 13 Greatest Vincent Price Movies

After an early Broadway debut, the late great Vincent Price (1911-1993) toiled in Hollywood films for over 50 years and appeared on countless TV shows (including everything from The Carol Burnett Show to The Brady Bunch). But, of course, the actor will always be remembered for his horror and villainous roles by generations of monster kids (whose ranks include director Tim Burton, who cast Price in one of his last—and best—screen assignments, 1990’s Edward Scissorhands). Chiller’s latest edition of The Friday 13 salutes the career of this scream legend on the occasion of his upcoming birthday (May 27). Helping us celebrate: Price’s own daughter and official biographer, Victoria. (Titles arranged according to year of release.)
1. The Invisible Man Returns (1940)
  • The Invisible Man Returns Trailer

At age 28, stage-trained thespian Vincent Price joined Universal Studios’ classic monsters bullpen in this sequel to the James Whale/Claude Raines hit. Price stars as a man scheduled to hang for a murder he didn’t commit who takes an invisibility serum to apprehend the real killer. “The first ‘glimpse’ (!) of what Vincent Price could do with just his voice,” recalls daughter Victoria Price. The mellifluous actor disappeared into the role again with an amusing voiceover cameo for 1948’s hilarious Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein.
2. Dragonwyck (1946)
  • Dragonwyck scene

In one of the parts dearest to his heart, Price portrays Nicholas Van Ryn, drug-addicted/wife murdering aristocrat, who lords over a gloomy mansion. “This movie meant a great deal to my father,” Victoria recalls. “He was playing a portly priest in Keys to the Kingdom, and he approached [director] Joe Mankiewicz with his desire to play the lead in Dragonwyck. The director basically said that he was totally the wrong type for the role. So my dad lost a lot of weight and really prepared for the audition—and got the role. It was his first leading film role in a genre that would become so important to him.”
3. House of Wax (1953)
  • House of Wax (1953) -- Unmasked

As the hideously scarred sculptor Henry Jarrod, who uses real human bodies as his museum wax figures, the art-loving actor cemented his reputation as a monstrous screen villain in this 3-D smash. “House of Wax came at a very important juncture in my father’s life,” reveals Victoria. “He had just been cleared from one of [Red Scare instigator] Joe McCarthy’s lists and allowed to work again in Hollywood. He was offered two roles—one on Broadway and one for a film about an artist incorporating an interesting new technology [3-D]. The rest, as they say, is history!”
4. House on Haunted Hill (1958)
  • Vincent Price - House On Haunted Hill - Trailer

In this wickedly scary gimmick film from producer/director William Castle, Price stars as a sarcastic millionaire who offers five strangers $10,000 a piece if they survive the night in the titular ghost hangout. This hit film garnered Price even more fans in the genre he would call home. Says Victoria, “Who doesn’t love Vincent Price as the elegantly evil Frederick Loren in House on Haunted Hill?”
5. House of Usher (1960)
  • The House of Usher (1960). The family, explained

Price’s career continued to ascend in horror circles when he top-lined this classy Edgar Allan Poe adaptation, scripted by Richard (Twilight Zone) Matheson and directed with stylish efficiency by B-movie king Roger Corman. “Roderick Usher was one of my dad’s great roles, in my opinion,” says Victoria of the tragic, hypersensitive Usher, a man with, let’s say, family issues. “As the tortured aesthete, he was so handsome in that film!”
6. The Pit and the Pendulum (1961)
  • The Pit and the Pendulum (1961) - The Pendulum Swings

The popularity of House of Usher for independent studio American International Pictures spawned a whole series of Poe flicks, most starring Price as equally troubled characters and bad guys. In Corman’s Pit and the Pendulum, Price limns Nicholas Medina, beleaguered son of a notorious Spanish Inquisition torturer who dusts off Pop’s ancient playthings thanks to his scheming wife (Barbara Steele). Shudders Victoria, “Pit and the Pendulum scared me to death when we had to watch it in school!”
7. The Comedy of Terrors (1963)
  • The Comedy of Terrors - Vincent Price (1/1) Not Quite Dead Enough (1963) HD

The horror celebrity always enjoyed sending up his image in both film and television, and in this hoot, directed by Cat People’s Jacques Tourneau, he’s a boozy undertaker who’ll literally murder for customers. “My dad loved getting to work with his dear friend Boris Karloff and the legendary Peter Lorre, whose eulogy he gave just a few years later,” remembers Victoria. “And boy did they have fun!” And we can tell!
8. The Masque of the Red Death (1964)
  • Theatrical Trailer - The Masque of the Red Death (Vincent Price)

In this masterpiece of Corman/AIP’s Poe cycle, Price essays the diabolical Prince Prospero, who throws a decadent bash while plague decimates those outside his castle walls. “A few years ago,Masque of the Red Death was shown at three straight events I attended,” Victoria notes of Masque’s enduring appeal amongst cinema scholars. “The movie is so surreal and ’60s. And Nic Roeg’s saturated cinematography is iconic.”
9. The Last Man on Earth (1964)
  • The Last Man on Earth - Vincent Price (1/1) The Living Dead Attack (1964) HD

Tinseltown raided Richard Matheson’s excellent novel I Am Legend (about a vampire-plagued world) three times, beginning with this low-budget effort. Price’s version stands as the most faithful to Matheson, and the Rome-lensed movie also proved even more significant to Victoria. Sshe explains, “I owe my existence to Last Man on Earth! My parents moved to Italy for an extended period of time. Let’s just say that ‘La Dolce Vita’ worked its magic on 44-year-old Mary Grant Price and 50-year-old Vincent Price. When my mother started craving Chinese food in Europe, they had no idea I was the cause. But I ended up being a very happy surprise for them both…all because ofLast Man on Earth!”
10. The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
  • The Tomb of Ligeia - Vincent Price (1/1) A Prophecy of Ligeia’s Return (1964) HD

With a literate script by future Chinatown scribe Robert Towne, Corman and Price ended their Poe run with a fiery finish. As the downcast Verden Fell, Price suffers at the hands—and possessed feline claws—of his jealous deceased wife, who stalks her man when he remarries. As the haunted husband, Price contributes a subdued and nuanced performance, never upstaged by the movie’s killer cat or impressive English locations. “Tomb of Ligeia was Vincent’s personal favorite Poe film,” his offspring reveals.
11. Witchfinder General (1968)
  • The Mark of Satan Is Upon Them - Witchfinder General (Vincent Price)

In this intense film (released in the U.S. as Conqueror Worm), St. Louis-born Price tackles real-life 17th century British witch hunter Matthew Hopkins, who traveled the English countryside persecuting innocent people for practicing witchcraft. As the despicable Hopkins, Price abandoned the flamboyance of some of his previous dastardly turns. “Working with [director] Michael Reeves was very, very difficult for my father,” admits Victoria. “He understood what Reeves wanted, but his methods and his youthful arrogance were difficult for my dad—who was about the nicest man on the planet. Ultimately, however, the malevolence which my father achieved made the part one of his most memorable.”
12. The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)
  • The flying unicorn Abominable Dr Phibes

In this art-deco tour de force, Price has a campy field day as the revenge-minded disfigured doctor who unleashes his own translation of the biblical plagues on the men who failed to save his wife’s life. Price returned as the noble madman in the equally entertaining Dr. Phibes Rises Again a year later. “Classic, stylistic and quirky, Dr. Phibes reteamed Vincent with his dear old friend of 40 years, Joseph Cotton,” says Victoria of the two actors who met while performing with Orson Welles’ Mercury Theatre. “And I am still struck by how expressive he was in that film of few words.”
13. Theater of Blood (1973)
  • Theatre of Blood (1973): A pound of flesh

An even blacker comedic twist on the Phibes pictures, Theater of Blood rates as Price’s cinematic triumph, and one that encapsulates his entire oeuvre. This occasion he’s failed Shakespearean actor Edward Lionheart who, believed dead, elaborately murders the stuffy British reviewers responsible for his worst notices. Victoria catalogues how much Theater of Blood meant to dear Dad: “When you get to: a) fall in love with your future wife [Coral Browne] in a graveyard; b) electrocute her while playing a gay hairdresser; c) kill off all the critics; d) work with Diana Rigg and so many other great British actors; and e) recite Shakespearean verse while doing all of the above—how could it not be one of my father’s favorite films?”

We could easily list another 13 petrifying Price pictures on this list, so if you have the desire to learn more about the man and his movies, go to www.vincentprice.com, check out Shout Factory’s definitive two volume Vincent Price Collection on disc and pick up Victoria’s wonderful book Vincent Price: A Daughter’s Biography, as well as Lucy Chase Williams’ The Complete Films of Vincent Price.

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